Lauren Davis
REALTY EXECUTIVES Boston West | 508-254-0449 | [email protected]


Posted by Lauren Davis on 8/17/2016

Is your home showing signs of wear and tear, presenting a worn and sad face to the world? Updating and remodeling are an ideal way to enhance the appearance, functionality, enjoyment, and value of your home. While home improvement is a great way to make your home a reflection of your personality, it is important to do a bit of planning and research before you begin. Do The Research Visit open houses, review decorating magazines, and visit home and garden shows for ideas and inspiration. There are so many new and innovative decorating trends and eco-friendly building products; you will want a clear idea in mind of your personal preferences. Prioritize Your Projects Like most homeowners, you probably have several ideas for home improvement projects that you would like to accomplish to improve the quality of your home and enhance your lifestyle. Replacing weather stripping and adding insulation to the attic should perhaps take priority over building an outdoor fireplace.  Evaluate Your Reasons For Remodeling First of all, consider if you plan to remain in the home for many years or if you are contemplating selling the property within the next five years. Some projects such as adding an in-ground swimming pool can offer years of enjoyment, but you may not recover your investment were you to put the house up for sale. On the other hand, a new roof adds to the value of the property and immediately impacts the home’s appeal to potential buyers. Decide On A Budget Many homeowners report they have “champagne taste and a beer budget.” It is wise to keep in mind that you can’t really enjoy your new media room if you spend all your time worrying about how your are going to pay for it. Not to worry. If you plan a budget for your project, you can stick to it by finding substitutes for some materials and products that will produce the same or similar appearance and functionality. Selecting laminate flooring instead of solid hardwood flooring is but one example. Determine If You Need A Professional Contractor Unless you are an experienced “do-it-yourself” type of homeowner, many jobs such as plumbing, roofing, electrical wiring, and masonry are best left to a professional contractor. On major jobs, even if you think you will do-it-yourself, it is wise to request bids from at least two independent reputable contractors. Not only will you learn someone else’s approach to the project, you may find that when you consider the time involved and that you may not have the appropriate skills, tools or equipment for the job, it is more time and cost efficient to hire a contractor.    




Tags: home remodel  
Categories: Uncategorized  


Posted by Lauren Davis on 10/7/2015

When spending big money on remodeling and upgrading your home, getting the most return for your investment is key. Spending $20,000 on an upgrade that isn't going to add value to your home may please you in the moment, but not when your trying to sell and get that money back. There are areas that are worth the investment and some that are not. The basic ares of your home are important to focus on. Things like your roof, furnace, and siding are all big investments that bring a big return. Potential buyers don't want to buy a home that they will need to sink thousands of more dollars into right away. Having a leaky roof will only deter people from making an offer. But being able to show that these essential areas are recently upgraded will give buyers the peace of mind that big maintenance costs won't hit them abruptly. The 2 rooms in the house that are always heavy hitters as far as return on investment is the kitchen and the bathroom. Making sure to upgrade these rooms to be both functional and beautiful is important. No one wants to buy a house that has a beautiful kitchen that doesn't have enough counter space, or the traffic flow doesn't work. Homeowners often find they get at least 100% return on investment in these 2 rooms. Other things to consider are the curb appeal of your home, and adding space. Both are considered to be high in the list of things to remodel. Curb appeal is important because it's going to not only draw buyers in, but also give a sense of a well maintained home. If you yard is in shambles, your home probably is too. In regards to adding space, every 1,000 square feet adds about 30% to the value of your home, so additions can be well worth it. Homeowners are always looking for homes with extra rooms for things like hobbies or exercise equipment. The only thing to be aware of is you don't want to expand your home so much that the value supersedes those in your neighborhood, so keep the additions reined in. Upgrading your home can not only make it a place for you enjoy even more, but also add significant value to it. But what you choose to spend the money on is key. Investing money in the wrong places will only leave you with wondering if you should have made a different choice.




Categories: Home Improvements  


Posted by Lauren Davis on 1/21/2015

What will boost your home's value? You want to add a sunroom but will that bring in the biggest bang for your buck? How about a new bathroom? It's a common question that many homeowners ask. What will we get back when we sell? This can be a hard question to answer but luckily Bankrate.com and Remodeling Magazine has come up with a list of the worst home fixes for the money. Here are the six improvements that ranked dead last nationally when it comes to getting those renovation dollars back at resale. 1. A Home Office-The standard home office renovation is this year's biggest loser in the resale value sweepstakes. Nationally, homeowners spent an average of $28,888 and can expect to recoup about 45.8 percent at resale, according to the report. If you want to enjoy a home office opt for something that is easily converted back into a bedroom or den. 2. Backup Generators-This only usually brings about negative thoughts like does this home loose power often? On average, when homeowners have a heavy-duty backup power generator installed, they spend about $14,718, according to the report. The average amount of the price recovered at resale time: 48.5 percent. 3. A Sunroom-While the thought is sitting and enjoying a sunroom may sound lovely to you but the addition of a sunroom is often more than you can recoup. The national average for a sunroom addition is $75,224, according to the report. Homeowners can expect to recoup about 48.6 percent when they sell. 4. A Master Suite-It is the price tag of this addition that can also leave sellers in the red. For a super-deluxe master suite addition -- which adds square footage and uses only top-dollar materials -- the average cost is about $232,062, according to the report. Sellers can expect to recover about 52.7 percent at resale. 5. An Extra Bathroom-Wait kitchens and bathrooms sells houses or that’s what people say. Bathroom additions are very expensive. For a moderately outfitted addition with synthetic stone or plastic laminate surfaces, plan on the cost about $21,695, according to the Remodeling report. Go upscale, with finishes like premium marble or fine tile, and you can easily spend in the neighborhood of $40,710. You can plan on a return of about 53 cents on the dollar. Look for less-expensive way to get the same results. Try reconfiguring your existing space to add a bathroom for less. 6. A Dream Garage-The price tag for a top-of-the-line detached two-car with all the trimmings is about $90,053, according to the report. This is a garage that is completely top-of-the-line. You can expect to recover about 53.6 percent of that when you sell. Instead go for function over form and stick the basic garage if you plan on a garage project.  





Posted by Lauren Davis on 9/19/2012

If you are looking for ways to increase the value of your home, then there are some simple guidelines to follow, as well as a few projects you may want to consider avoiding altogether.  Depending on the region, a particular home remodel has the potential to make or break a potential sale. Swimming Pools - Homes with swimming pools generally do better in the warmer states, where they can be seen as a welcome addition during the hottest months.  However, a home in New England that has a pool is increasingly likely to be viewed as a headache.  Maintenance costs, family safety, and seasonal accessibility make this addition one that is in reality more likely to hurt the chances of being able to sell your home quickly.  Not to say that you shouldn't have a pool if you have your heart set on it.  Just don't count on it making your house more appealing.  If you already have a pool, then try to sell your home in the spring or summer, when the pool is in use.  This will help potential buyers see the benefit of the addition, without reminding them of the headaches associated with upkeep. Koi ponds and indoor aquariums - These items, while beloved to a homeowner, may turn off a buyer who isn't interested in being a pet owner.  There aren't a lot of uses for an aquarium installed in a wall for someone who doesn't like the idea of having fish.  Similarly, koi ponds on the property have the capability of turning off an owner that doesn't necessarily want to have a portion of their backyard dedicated to a project that they have no interest in taking over. Converting garages and second bedrooms - While these renovations generally arise from necessity, they can hurt your resale value in the future.  Garage space is fairly desirable these days, and especially so in cold climates that deal with large amount of snow.  Converting a garage in New England isn't generally a good idea unless you absolutely need the space.  This is also true in the cases of converting second and third bedrooms into office spaces.  While a new buyer may consider at a later date to convert an extra bedroom into an office space, they may not want to have the option forced on them.  Most of the time, a two-bedroom house with an office will remain on the market longer than a three-bedroom house. Fireplaces - They can be beautiful, yes, but fireplaces are quickly falling out of favor with buyers, and are increasingly being seen as a messy addition to a home.  In 2009, a consumer preference survey from the Nation Association of Home Builders ranked fireplaces as No. 1 on a list of what NAR called “Home Fads That Are Falling Out of Style.”  Not to say that fireplaces don't have a market.  Many people are still looking for homes that contain one or even two.  But installing a fireplace in an existing home can be very expensive, and the return on your investment wouldn't be that great.