Lauren Davis
REALTY EXECUTIVES Boston West | 508-254-0449 | [email protected]


Posted by Lauren Davis on 4/21/2021

Have you heard a lot about HUD homes, but arenít sure if you should buy one or what the process entails?  HUD stands for The Department Of Housing And Urban Development. The FHA (Federal Housing Administration) is a part of HUD. The FHA is where federal mortgage insurance comes from. If a home is foreclosed on and insured by the FHA, the lender has a right to file a claim for the balance due on the mortgage. The FHA will pay this claim, and then transfer the ownership of the property to the HUD who will sell the home.


Will A HUD Home Provide A Price Break? 


The answer to this question is not necessarily. A HUD home is appraised just like any other home for sale. The price is based on the fair market value of the home. The prices may be adjusted according to any repairs that need to be made to the home. Itís a good idea to have your realtor look into comparable prices for HUD homes, as these properties arenít guaranteed to be a deal.


Know that HUD homes are sold as-is. There isnít much negotiating like that of a typical home purchase. As the new owner, youíll be responsible for all of the repairs. Itís a good idea to invest in a home inspection before you buy a HUD home for this reason. Youíll have a better understanding of what youíre getting into with this type of home purchase. 


How Do You Begin The Search For A HUD Home?


Housing and Urban Development homes are listed by state on the departmentís website. This is a good place to start your search. The site also lists brokers who are approved by the HUD. You can then contact local brokers to show you the HUD properties that youíre interested in.


The Process Of Making An Offer


Buying a HUD property can be very different than buying any other type of home in that the offer process is a bit different. These properties are sold through bids. You must hire a licensed real estate agent to assist you in this process, you canít just put a bid in on your own. Youíll need to be sure that your offer is placed during the designated offer period. Either the highest bid is accepted or the bid that came in first in order will be taken. Generally, the HUD wants to take the offer that will get them the most profit.


Careful With Financing


The HUD does not finance homes. Youíll need to apply for a mortgage just as you would in buying any other home. Before you can even make an offer on a home you must have approved financing. If for some reason you get through the process of having your offer accepted on the home and the financing falls through, thereís a chance that you could lose your earnest money deposit.     

     





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Posted by Lauren Davis on 2/19/2014

If you have been dreaming of owning a vacation home now may be the time to buy. Home prices and mortgage rates continue to fall and there are some great deals for buyers looking for a second home. Here are five things you need to know before taking the leap. 1. Prices are at all-time lows In many second-home hot spots, prices are still close to their five-year lows. When the real-estate bubble burst, some of the hardest-hit markets were vacation destinations. Many vacation home areas experienced overgrowth and may now be suffering from foreclosures. 2. Think ROI Consider the possible return on your investment. Whether or not you decide to rent the home out, you will want to consider buying a place that has good rent potential. That's because a home's rent ability can affect its resale value. Before you bid on a house, make sure the homeowners association or township allows short-term rentals. 3. Don't count on rental income If you are planning on counting on rental income to cover the costs beware. According to HomeAway.com, a typical second home property rents out just 17 weeks a year. Make sure to account for the weeks the home won't rent. Plus, you'll need to pay for cleaning, maintenance, insurance, and maybe management fees. Make sure to plan on the maintenance costs of the property being at least 15% of the income. 4. Your mortgage rate depends on how you use the home How you use the home depends on the mortgage rate you will receive. If you plan to use the property primarily as a second home and you'll pay about the same mortgage rate as you would on a primary residence. If your plans are to use the home for rental income and need that income to qualify for the loan, you'll need to have as much as 25% for the down payment and pay up to one percentage point more in interest. 5. Take advantage of tax benefits Talk to your tax guy before you buy. If you rent the home out for two weeks or less you won't have to report a cent of income to the IRS. The good news here, you can still deduct property taxes and mortgage interest. On the flipside, if you stay there for less than two weeks or 10% of rental days, you can deduct operating costs in addition to interest and property tax. But where should you buy? According to CNBC here are the top places to buy a second home. If you are thinking about buying a second home I can help you find a professional agent in that area.